Australians turn to technology for shopping: ANRA

28 June 2012 (Last Updated June 28th, 2012 07:00)

Australians are increasingly using technology to help them shop, with nearly 40% having used a smart phone or an iPad to compare prices, according to the latest research from the Australian National Retailers Association (ANRA).

Australians are increasingly using technology to help them shop, with nearly 40% having used a smart phone or an iPad to compare prices, according to the latest research from the Australian National Retailers Association (ANRA).

The association's latest survey of 1000 Australians from across the nation tried to find their shopping habits and how they use technology in-store.

ANRA chief executive officer Margy Osmond said that almost a quarter of Australians have used a phone app as a shopping aid and 38% have compared prices in-store using technology.

"We have known for some time that Gens Y and X are bargain hunters, and now they are employing their smartphones and iPads to hunt down deals, but the use of gadgets is now growing across the board," Osmond added.

"Almost half of young Aussies (41%) have downloaded an app to help them shop, and 43% have used technology instore.

"What is perhaps more surprising is it is males employing their gadgetry to get shopping - while 22% of us have used Ipad or phone apps - 25% of men have, which has added a new dimension to how retailers will use it."

Men are also more likely to turn to a computer or phone to get the best deal, as the latest survey found that 44% used it.

In addition, the survey showed that 50% of 25-34 year olds check the intnet for a deal while at the stores.

Osmond said that more than 80% of those who did comparison shop while in-store chose to buy from another retailer, which will increase pressure on retailers to keep prices as low as possible.

"Late last year 27% of people used technology as a price comparison tool instore, while of those 79% chose to shop elsewhere as result. Men were leading that charge then with 31% and 49% of 18-24 year olds compared to 42% of 25-34 year olds were employing the technology."