Waitrose to eliminate use of glitter in its product range by 2020

18 December 2018 (Last Updated December 18th, 2018 10:39)

British supermarket chain Waitrose & Partners has committed to eliminate the use of glitter in its own label cards, wrap, crackers, tags, flowers and plants by Christmas 2020.

Waitrose to eliminate use of glitter in its product range by 2020
Waitrose to eliminate various glitter-based products by Christmas 2020. Credit: Waitrose.

British supermarket chain Waitrose & Partners has committed to eliminate the use of glitter in its own label cards, wrap, crackers, tags, flowers and plants by Christmas 2020.

The decision to go glitter-free and use environmentally friendly alternatives follows after several nursery schools and music festivals in the UK, including a news programme, Strictly Come Dancing, by BBC 1 have announced to stop the use of traditional glitter.

Glitter is prepared using tiny pieces of plastic, which cannot be recycled. When these pieces end up in water, they contribute to plastic pollution.

Around 75% of Waitrose’s own label cards, wraps, crackers and tags, as well as 50% of its flowers and plants will be glitter-free this year.

“Reducing the impact of plastics on the environment is something our customers care passionately about.”

Waitrose & Partners health & agriculture CSR head Tor Harris said: “Reducing the impact of plastics on the environment is something our customers care passionately about.

“While it’s important to eliminate the use of glitter, we’ll find other ways to make sure our products sparkle at Christmas and throughout the year.”

In 2016, the supermarket chain removed plastics from its beauty products by replacing plastic cotton buds with biodegradable paper.

Waitrose also revised its target to make its own brand packaging recycled, reusable or home compostable from 2025 to 2023.

The retailer expects to replace nearly 11,000 tonnes of non-recycled plastic with more sustainable alternatives in those two years.

Since 2009, Waitrose has reduced its packaging by almost 50% through various initiatives such as removing disposable coffee cups from stores, eliminating microbeads from its products and introducing alternatives to plastic.