1. News
April 11, 2022

Amazon calls for election re-run as workers vote to unionise

The retailer has listed 25 objections and accused the ALU of coercing workers into voting for the union.

E-commerce giant Amazon has reportedly called for an election re-run after workers at a New York City warehouse voted to create the company’s first US union.

Reuters reported that the retailer claimed the result was suppressed by the US National Labour Relations Board (NLRB) and union organisers.

In a filing obtained by The Associated Press, Amazon is said to have listed 25 objections and accused the organisers and Amazon Labor Union (ALU) of intimidating workers into voting for the union.

Among other objections, the company said that organisers ‘intentionally created hostile confrontations in front of eligible voters’.

Amazon spokesperson Kelly Nantel said: “Based on the evidence we’ve seen so far, as set out in our objections, we believe that the actions of the NLRB and the ALU improperly suppressed and influenced the vote, and we think the election should be conducted again so that a fair and broadly representative vote can be had.”

Last week, warehouse workers in Staten Island, New York, voted by around 55% to 45% to unionise on a turnout of 2,654.

The NLRB will need to process Amazon’s objections before certifying the election result.

In a statement, Attorney Eric Milner said: “The employees have spoken.

“Amazon is choosing to ignore that, and instead engage in stalling tactics to avoid the inevitable – coming to the bargaining table and negotiating for a contract.”

The development comes after employees at Amazon France logistics centres staged protests over an annual pay rise dispute last week.

Amazon has offered its employees a 3% rise, but unions have said this should be increased to 5% as a minimum.

The strike action began on 5 April and has led to staff walkouts at all eight of Amazon’s logistics centres in France.

Unions are due to meet with the management of the logistics centres on 14 April to discuss the dispute further.